Scientists Discover a ‘Force-Field’ Around the Human Body That You Can Actually Feel

-by Arjun Walia

The human body is fascinating, and although we’ve come a long way with regard to understanding how our own biology works, there is still much to be discovered, and still much that has yet to be understood. Even with all of our advancements, and how far we’ve come, it’s but a minor peak in a long road of discovery.

How do we sense the world around us? Are there hidden factors which are UN-observable that remain hidden from the human eye? Sure there are. Why do we duck before coming to a low ceiling? Why do we dodge things that are thrown at us? Do we have more senses than we’ve been lead to believe, and do these senses play a role?

New research from scientists at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden have used a very well known experiment, called “the rubber hand illusion,” to demonstrate that humans can sense what feels like a “force field” between the brush and the rubber hand.

The rubber hand experiment causes people to feel that a rubber hand placed on the table before them is their own. A great example of a shift in perception that is followed by a sense of disowning their real hand.

As a piece from The Guardian explains, “The illusion comes on when the real and fake hands are stroked at the same time and speed for a minute or two. In combining the visual information with the touch sensations, the brain mistakenly concludes that the rubber hand must be part of the person’s body. When questioned about the feeling, the volunteers said it seemed that their own hand had vanished and the fake hand had become their own.”

Participants are usually shown a fake rubber hand while their own is behind the screen. It’s  amazing how the brain starts to believe that the fake hand is actually their own, and makes you ponder what else is illusionary, yet considered real by our brain. If you’re interested in that, you might want to look up concepts like the “Holographic Universe.”

In this particular case, the rubber hand experiment was modified. This time, scientists duplicated the test but instead of touching the fake hand, they applied brushstrokes in mid-air, above the fake hand.

The study involved 101 adults, and instead of participants  believing the fake hand is their own, they started to sense what feels like a “force field” between the rubber hand and the brush.

Although it may seem like it, this isn’t a new phenomenon. As The Huffington Post points out:

“Neuroscientific Evidence of the phenomenon first emerged in the late 1990s in animal studies. Princeton University’s Michael Graziano recorded the electrical activity of neurons in the parietal and frontal lobes of the brains of monkeys. They found that some neurons fired not just when they were touched by an object, but also when it came near them.”

Quite remarkable, isn’t it? This means that we have the ability to sense the world around us, without the use of what are our commonly believed “6 senses.” We clearly have more that we are unaware of, and this could be one of several.

The study posits that this sensation continues at at least 15 inches above the rubber hand

Arvid Guterstam of the Karolinska Institute, and co-author of the study told New Scientist:

“We can elicit this bizarre sensation of there actually being something in mid-air between the brush and the rubber hand.”

It’s been dubbed as “peripersonal” space, used to help us navigate through the physical world with safety.

But Wait, There’s More…

More research to complement this type of research has emerged, adding more confusion to the puzzle. In neuroscience, there’s a term known as Predictive Anticipatory Activity (PAA). More than 40 experiments investigating PAA in humans have been published over the past 36 years (including: Hartwell, 1978Radin et al., 19952011Bierman and Radin, 1997Radin, 19972004Don et al., 1998;Bierman, 2000Bierman and Scholte, 2002McDonough et al., 2002Spottiswoode and May, 2003;McCraty et al., 2004a,bSartori et al., 2004May et al., 2005Tressoldi et al., 200520092011Radin and Borges, 2009Bradley et al., 2011).

One study found that the body can actually sense events up to 10 seconds before they happen. The study was published in the journal Frontiers of Human Neuroscience titled “Predicting the unpredictable: critical analysis and practical implications of predictive anticipatory activity” examined a number of experiments regarding this phenomenon that were conducted by several different laboratories.

You can read more about that HERE.

Don’t Forget About The Department of Defense Examining Other Human Senses, from Remote Viewing, to psychokinesis and more. You’ll learn more about that from the Stargate Program.

We also have a lot of articles pertaining to this on our website. Here’s a related one as an example that you can check out if interested:

CIA Document Confirms Reality of Humans With Special Abilities Able To Do Impossible Things.

The wonderful and brilliant scientists over at the Institute of HeartMath have done some amazing work shedding light on the science of the heart, as well as the electromagnetic fields that all life has surrounding it, and how these fields communicate with the fields of others, and can change depending on what emotions we are feeling. They are also deeply connected to our biology.

You can learn more about that by checking out these related articles:

What Science Is Telling us About The Heart’s Intuitive Intelligence

Synchronization of Autonomic Nervous System Rhythms With Geomagnetic Activity Found In Human Subjects


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